Dr. Theall's Blog

Posts for tag: poor circulation

By Bruce Theall, DPM (Gentle Touch)
January 28, 2020
Category: Diabetes
Tags: poor circulation   PAD  

One of the ways that diabetes impacts your feet is by causing decreased circulation. This becomes dangerous, as poor circulation decreases the amount of time it takes to heal wounds like ulcers (which commonly affect people with diabetes). Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is the condition that describes this symptom. As the team of doctors at Gentle Touch Footcare works with patients who have diabetes, knowing risks and prevention tips is a big part of the conversation. Here are some commonly asked questions about the condition:

What causes PAD?

Most commonly, the cause of peripheral arterial disease is another disease: atherosclerosis. In short, atherosclerosis is a result of plaque building up in a patient’s arteries. This condition typically affects the arteries in your legs, but it can also impact other areas.

Are there behaviors that increase my chance of developing PAD?

Elderly patients commonly develop this condition because the plaque buildup has progressed over time. Other risk factors for developing this condition include, among others:

  • Diabetes
  • Hypertension
  • Smoking
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Alcoholism
  • Poor diet
  • Family history
  • Overweight
  • High cholesterol

Are there symptoms of this condition?

If you notice any changes to your legs or feet, we always recommend that you schedule an appointment with our office. Symptoms include:

  • Feeling cold and having discolored feet or legs
  • Non-healing wounds on the feet or legs
  • Following exercise, pain in your legs or feet (relieved during rest)
  • Lessened or absent foot pulses
  • Pain in your legs and feet while resting in the bed

If I have the above symptoms, what’s next?

We will recommend that you take a PAD vascular test. We have state-of-the-art testing procedures, and the test is painless and done in less than 30 minutes.

Early detection of PAD can reduce your chances of conditions that can eventually result in amputations. Make an appointment with our doctors, Bruce Theall, DPM, and Priscilla Seshie, DPM, to allow us to perform a test. Call us today at 973-673-3668. Our office is located at 310 Central Avenue East, Orange, NJ, 07018.

By Dr. Bruce Theall
April 29, 2016
Category: Diabetes
Tags: poor circulation   Daibetes   arteries  

Diabetes can affect everyone and anyone from all walks of life.  Sometimes it is the people who we most look up to that are afflicted with terrible diseases.  Rashad Jennings was drafted by the Jacksonville Jaguars in the seventh round of the 2009 NFL Draft, Jennings played for the Oakland Raiders in 2013 before signing with the Giants for a 14 million dollar contract.  Running back Rashad Jennings of the NY Giants has a strong familial element of diabetes running in his family. 

                According to Rashad Jennings “I did a 180 in my life – an overweight, chubby kid with glasses and asthma, I had to figure something out,” Jennings said.  When he was in high school he weighed 270 lbs and did not get much time on the football field.  He has always known that he wanted to play in the NFL and wanted to make a commitment to himself and to his father who has had a long history of diabetes.  Jennings father is now a double amputee who has diabetes, and has suffered the extreme consequences from this debilitating disease.  Rashad dedicates his games to his dad every time he runs, as a reminder to himself that his father can no longer. 

                The truth about the complications from diabetes is that people with diabetes are 5 times as likely to have a stroke than people without diabetes, 4 times as likely to have coronary artery disease, 5 times as likely to have peripheral arterial disease, and diabetes who smoke are 50% more likely to have an amputation, or loss of limb. 

A podiatrist is the only person that is trained in a specialized field in medicine for anything concerning the lower extremity, foot and ankle, that’s why it is vital for you to visit your podiatrist if there are any problems concerning your feet.  All patients being treated for diabetes should follow up with their primary doctor as well for other treatment options.  If there are any other questions feel free to contact Dr. Theall’s Gentle Touch Foot Care office for all your foot and ankle needs and concerns at 973 673 – 3668.

By Dr. Bruce Theall
April 11, 2016
Category: Diabetes
Tags: neuropathy   poor circulation   diabtes  

In recent news, Phife Dawg of the hip hop group A Tribe Called Quest passed away at the young age of 45 due to complications from the long standing disease of diabetes.  Malik Izaak Taylor was born November 20, 1970, and left his mark on this earth as one of the most influential hip hop artists and was the founding member of the group A Tribe Called Quest.  A group that he and his fellow high school classmates Q-Tip and Ali Shaheed Muhammad, created in their youth.

Phife Dawg was diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes mellitus in May 1990, and has been battling with the disease ever since.  Diabetes is a complex, chronic disorder of carbohydrates, fat, and protein metabolism that results in a combination of glucose (sugar) over production and a high accumulation in the body.  Diabetes is a multiple systemic disease that can affect your nerves (neuropathy), eyes (retinopathy), and kidneys (nephropathy).  Your sugar can be best monitored with daily sugar checks and the hemoglobin A1c.  Hemoglobin A1c is a long term sugar test that will tell you how much sugar is circulating in your body over a period 3 months.  The higher the daily sugar, or the higher the A1c, the more sugar that is unable to leave your body.  Sugar leaves your body through sweat and urination and is also burned up with daily activity, however, kidney failure is a major side effect that can prove to be fatal from diabetes if not monitored and treated.  It should also be said that people with diabetes mellitus are 2 to 4 times more likely to have heart and vascular disease and almost 3 times as likely to have a stroke. 

Phife Dawg’s health was diminishing due to the long term elevated sugar levels from his uncontrolled diabetes.  He was placed on a kidney transplant list for the past couple years which was unsuccessful.  He then was placed on another transplant list and received a kidney from his wife in 2008.  The transplant was unsuccessful.  He was then again placed on another transplant list in 2012. Phife Dawg died on March 22, 2016 due to complications relating to the diabetes. 

A podiatrist is the only person that is trained in a specialized field in medicine for anything concerning the lower extremity, foot and ankle, that’s why it is vital for you to visit your podiatrist if there are any problems concerning your feet.  All patients being treated for diabetes should follow up with their primary doctor as well for other treatment options.  If there are any other questions feel free to contact Dr. Theall’s Gentle Touch Foot Care office for all your foot and ankle needs and concerns at 973 – 673 – 3668.

By Dr. Bruce Theall
March 25, 2016
Category: Foot Care
Tags: neuropathy   poor circulation   diabtes  

Now that those winter holidays are over, for many of us during that time is a special time of year when we can relax with family, travel and see some friends, buy and wrap gifts, and enjoying some home cooked holiday meals and treats.  It is important for all, not just diabetics, to be careful around the holiday time when choosing what to eat and more importantly how much to eat.

The holidays are typically filled with cookies, cakes, pies, doughnuts, pastries, brownies, and many more.  All of those which are filled with sugar and fat which can dramatically increase ones blood sugar, which is bad for diabetes.  Diabetes is the known as “starvation in the midst of plenty”, meaning that your body is telling you to eat more, but it already has an abundance of sugar, but you are consciously unaware.  This pertains not only to adults, but also children, which can cause Type 1- IDDM (insulin dependent diabetes mellitus) or “juvenile onset” – accounts for 15-20% of cases, people who suffer from this are typically young, thin, and prone to acidosis.  With adults, Type 2- NIDDM (non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus); “adult or mature onset” patients are usually obese and older.  This accounts for 90% of adults with DM are type 2 and 40-50% of new onset DM in children is Type 2 and it is estimated that about 20% of type 2 diabetics are taking insulin and is more common in African-American, and Hispanic cultures. 

Watching your weight during the holiday season can be difficult, but you must make sure that your BMI (body mass index) does not increase with the weight gain, which can be very important for diabetics because once there is added weight this contributes with more negative effects to diabetes.  The body mass index is a person's weight in kilograms, divided by the person's height squared and in meters.  A healthy body mass index is thought be anything below 25.  It is a calculated number from person's weight and height that can fairly reliable indicator of body fatness for most people, but it does not measure body fat directly, but research has shown that the BMI correlates to direct measures of body fat.  It is a screening tool to identify possible weight problems for adults but it is not a diagnostic tool. 

They key is to try to stay away from the sweets and candies of the holiday and substitute it with healthier alternatives such as natural fruits like apples, bananas, oranges, and more vegetables.  It may be very difficult to do so with temptation in front of you, but you must always think of your health first.  Portion control is the second most important thing you can do to protect yourself from unhealthy foods and to keep your diabetes from reaching serious complications from high sugar levels such as neuropathy, poor circulation, and ulceration.  Instead of eating a whole plate of food, eat a half of a plate.  If you are still hungry after the half plate, then eat some salad, which is must easier for the body to break down and use as energy. 

A podiatrist is the only person that is trained in a specialized field in medicine for anything concerning the lower extremity, foot and ankle, that’s why it is vital for you to visit your podiatrist if there are any problems concerning your feet.  All patients being treated for diabetes should follow up with their primary doctor as well for other treatment options.  If there are any other questions feel free to contact Dr. Theall’s Gentle Touch Foot Care office for all your foot and ankle needs and concerns at 973 673 - 3668.

By Dr. Bruce Theall
March 12, 2015
Category: Diabetes

People with Diabetes need access to doctors and medicines to help them keep their disease under control, but they also need food in their pantries and money in their pockets to pay for necessities like rent and heat. Studies show that patients being treated for Type 2 diabetes who suffer from food insecurity and those who try skimping on their meds were only half as likely as their more financially secure counterparts to be managing their disease.

Although some aspects of health are controlled by factors outside medical system, doctors are increasingly being held accountable when their patients miss their targets for things like blood sugar and cholesterol. It stands to reason that better access to medical care ought to improve people's health. But clinical trials have found that things aren't always so simple for low income patients with Diabetes. Unfortunately poor diabetic care maintenance can lead to complications including nerve damage and poor blood circulation. These problems make the feet vulnerable to skin sores (ulcers) that can worsen quickly and are difficult to treat. The good news is that proper diabetes management and careful foot care can help prevent foot ulcers and lowers the rates of  limb amputations.

The best strategy for preventing complications of diabetes — including foot ulcers — is proper diabetes management with a healthy diet, regular exercise, blood sugar monitoring and adherence to a prescribed medication regimen. If problems with Diabetes affect your feet, you can contact Gentle Touch Foot care for a complete evaluation. To schedule an appointment call 973 673-3668.